The Hum Of Concrete: Interacting With The Built Environment

'The Hum of Concrete' challenges four Adelaide acts to share responses to their environments in an evening of roving performance. 'The Hum of Concrete' challenges four Adelaide acts to share responses to their environments in an evening of roving performance.

With The Hum of Concrete, Jen Lush challenges four Adelaide acts to share responses to their environments in an evening of roving performance, storytelling and song at The Mill.


The event’s title comes from a book by Adelaide author Anna Solding, 'The Hum Of Concrete: A Novel Constellation', which inspired Lush to consider her own connection to the built environment around her in Adelaide, and how it might be entangled with others.

“It's one of my favourite books: a collection of short stories, or a story of five people whose lives intersect... I love this idea of five artists and how the stories intersect in the city environment,” Jen says.

The artists selected to perform are sure to delight with tales from near and far. Some were raised locally and some arrived as travellers, but have chosen to settle around the city.

Off the back of performing at the National Folk Festival, multi-instrumentalist Jimmybay Hall kicks off the suite of stories shared under The Mill roof. Jen describes him as a “folksy blues and roots powerhouse”, and he’s rumoured to have the best-sounding suitcase in Adelaide, turning it into a kick drum as he spins tales of adventure on the road.

“He’s going to bring a lot of energy to the site,” she says.


'One of a kind' Loren Kate, based in beach country Aldinga, will share her beautifully heartbreaking songs. “[She] writes about the space she’s in and her longing to find freedom, but at the same time, feel those roots in a space,” Jen says.

In contrast, Mark Curtis and the Flannelettes bring tonnes of witty banter and fun, indie folk-rock jams to the space. Their songwriting is compelling and clever, and locals might recognise some favourite spots in the lyrics.

“They’ve got a song that talks about walking through the city, and they mention the Grace Emily and other landmarks as part of their sense of self and identity.”

Dee Trewartha and Emma Luker are the Fiddle Chicks, who’ll draw audiences into The Mill and travel alongside them throughout the performances.

Jen, who also curates monthly music night Stone Pony in Willunga, will also be joining the bill. She’ll share material she’s recently developed with a focus on art, motherhood and living in the suburbs.

“[It’s about] the tangle and tension, freedoms and limitations that are created when those elements run up against each other, battling for airspace,” she says. “I think the spaces in your head can be just as restrictive or open as the built environment.”

The Hum Of Concrete takes place at The Mill (Adelaide) on 26 July, as part of Umbrella: Winter City Sounds.

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